Masa Ball Soup (Sopa de Bolitas)

Cooking With Kennedy, Recipes | September 9, 2016 | By

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Masa Ball Soup (Sopa de Bolitas)
Serves 4
A simple little soup with corn dough fritters and a tomato/chicken broth.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
1 hr
899 calories
11 g
57 g
92 g
10 g
8 g
562 g
1050 g
3 g
1 g
80 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
562g
Servings
4
Amount Per Serving
Calories 899
Calories from Fat 817
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 92g
142%
Saturated Fat 8g
41%
Trans Fat 1g
Polyunsaturated Fat 16g
Monounsaturated Fat 64g
Cholesterol 57mg
19%
Sodium 1050mg
44%
Total Carbohydrates 11g
4%
Dietary Fiber 2g
9%
Sugars 3g
Protein 10g
Vitamin A
29%
Vitamin C
17%
Calcium
13%
Iron
11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
The Broth
  1. 1/2 pound (225g) tomatoes, roughly chopped
  2. 1/4 white onion, finely chopped
  3. 1 clove garlic
  4. 1/4 cup water (65ml)
  5. 1 tablespoon light cooking oil
  6. Salt to taste
  7. 6 cups concentrated chicken broth (1.5L)
  8. 2 epazote leaves
Masa Balls
  1. 1 chile ancho, de-seeded
  2. 1 chicken egg
  3. Salt to taste
  4. 5 tbsp grated queso añejo
  5. 1 1/4 Cups prepared corn tortilla masa
  6. 1-2 cups light oil for frying masa balls
For the Broth
  1. Blend the tomatoes (unpeeled, just chopped) along with the onion, garlic and water into your blender and pulse until the mix is almost uniform, but not quite.
  2. In a skillet or frying pan, heat up that tablespoon of oil, then add the mix from the blender. If the oil is too hot, it will splatter.
  3. Cook the tomato mixture for 8-10 minutes on a medium/high heat, let it reduce down by about 1/4.
  4. Meanwhile, heat your chicken broth to a low simmer in another pot with the epazote. (If you cannot find epazote in your local carniceria or Latin market, you can use a few springs of cilantro for this recipe)
  5. Add the reduced tomato mixture to the chicken broth, stir to incorporate, and salt to taste. Keep on low heat.
For the Masa Balls
  1. Soak the chile ancho in hot water while you are working on the broth.
  2. Once it is re-hydrated and the blender is free, add the chile in strips to the blender with the egg. Blend until there are no large bits of the chile.
  3. Incorporate the chile/egg mixture-along with your grated cheese-into the masa.
  4. Salt the masa to taste, set aside.
  5. Heat your remaining oil in a small/medium skillet or frying pan.
  6. Using a melon baller or your eyes, make balls no larger than 1 inch in diameter and fry up a manageable number, turning in the oil until they are golden brown and cooked through (about 6 minutes), then transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate.
Plating
  1. Serve the broth (a couple ladles will do) over 5 fried masa balls. If you want to adorn your soup, you can add a little cilantro, grated cheese and limes for squeezing.
Adapted from The Art of Mexican Cooking
beta
calories
899
fat
92g
protein
10g
carbs
11g
more
Adapted from The Art of Mexican Cooking
The Smokey Sombrero https://smokeysombrero.com/
It sounds like they should be, but I don’t think these are kosher.
This is a relatively quick soup that as it turns out, my kids loved. Basically, this is a tomato/chicken soup with little corn dough fritters floating in it. To make it, you need to have chicken stock on hand. If you make Mexican food more than once or twice a week, or buy rotisserie chickens from your international warehouse store, that’s pretty easy to do. You can also use the  boxed/canned variety.

I found that this soup ended up with a really approachable (read: my four-year-old liked it) consistency. It is important to simmer the tomato mixture to set those flavors and the color.

Reducing the tomato mixture results in darker color and better flavor

Reducing the tomato mixture results in darker color and better flavor

A note about the cheese, if you cannot get añejo, a dry Italian cheese like Romano or Pecorino will work. A dry chile like cascabel or guajillo can also be substituted here, though ancho tend to be easiest to find.When making the masa balls, keep them under the 1 inch size, any larger and they will likely be uncooked inside. Too small and they’ll end up crunchy or leathery. My four-year-old asked for more bolitas several times. The chile wasn’t spicy.

The masa balls should not be too sticky to roll, if they are, a bit of nixtamalized corn flour (aka maseca) may be added to the dough, though they will fry just fine.Once the masa balls are ready to fry, just take care not to let them flatten out, keep them moving in the pan and cook them until they are crisp and brown on the outside. With a bit of ham, cheese or chorizo inside, these would probably make a nice little hors d’oeuvres. The soup is surprisingly light and not substantial enough to stand alone as a meal.

Masa ready to be formed

Masa ready to be formed

Masa ball ready for frying

Masa ball ready for frying

 

Masa balls frying

Masa balls frying